THE STORY OF THE JEWISH DEFENSE LEAGUE Page 47
Chapter 1: Soviet Jewry: I Am My Brother’s Keeper
 
 
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Soviet Jewry 47

bmen, were in a difficult position and grudgingly offering the bleast they had to. We were not selling them peace at that bprice; it was far too cheap, far too low.

bProbably the most amusing (or least amusing, depending bon one’s point of view) part of the sudden, electrifying bchange in Soviet policy was the confusion that it sowed bamong the respectable Jews who were in the forefront of the battacks on Jewish militancy that was going to “bring disaster” bto Soviet Jewry. Their intellectual contortions and learned bexplanations were sophisticated things of beauty. It was bimpossible to come to the horrifying conclusion that mili- btancy had succeeded, and so the world was treated to edify- bing explanations that the liberalization was only a temporary bthing that had been put into effect because of the 24th bCommunist Party Congress scheduled to be held in Moscow bon March 30th. Other learned “Soviet Jewologists” allowed bas the reason the possibility that the Soviets simply wanted to bget rid of their “troublemakers” and thus put an end to the bagitation, following which the emigration would slow down. bJewish brilliance was piled on top of Jewish brilliance so that, bat all costs, simple common sense would not win out and bprove that JDL had been right all along. No matter, the bmonths to come would make things even more difficult for bthe intellectual nitpickers of the Wexler-Schacter-AJC bschool of thoughtlessness.

bAs February drew to a close, the Jewish Post and Opinion, bunder the headline “Defense League Hardly Stymied,” bstated: “Despite the almost overwhelming opposition from bthe Jewish Establishment, the Jewish Defense League bseemed to be making progress in its efforts to build a mili- btant Jewish organization.

b“Two straws in the wind were meetings addressed by JDL bchief Rabbi Meir Kahane in Montreal and Philadelphia. bDespite the continuous barrage of denunciations from bJewish sources, 1,300 came out to give a standing ovation to bRabbi Kahane [in Montreal], while the Philadelphia meet- bing drew a similar response with 500 in attendance, mostly byoungsters . . . .

b“Meanwhile, rabbinical views seemed slowly to be crystal- blizing and while not openly advocating methods employed b 

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THE STORY OF THE JEWISH DEFENSE LEAGUE Page 47
Chapter 1: Soviet Jewry: I Am My Brother’s Keeper