THE STORY OF THE JEWISH DEFENSE LEAGUE Page 70
Chapter 3: The Jewish Establishment
 
 
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70 The Story of the Jewish Defense League

bformed the Jewish community that it was satisfied that the bsigners of the ad were “a radical and tiny fringe of the Black bcommunity and in no way representative of it.”

bThis was the blindness and madness of the Jewish Estab- blishment and the liberal spokesman whose attitude was so bincredibly summed up in a New Republic article called b“Inflating the Threat of Black Anti-Semitism.”

bHow different the perception and frankness of Nazi bleader George Lincoln Rockwell, who in his Rockwell bReport as far back as March 1, 1963, wrote: “And in the last btwo or three years the Negroes are becoming anti-Semitic by bthe millions . . . the situation with American Negroes is balready dynamite for the Jews.”

bThe reaction of the Jewish leadership defied belief. Years bafter Mattapan, Dorchester, and Roxbury—once bustling, bproud, and happy Boston Jewish communities—had died band the wealthy and fortunate Jews had fled to Brookline band Newton, the Boston Jewish Advocate, spokesman for bthe Jews who did not live in the disaster areas and who did bnot feel the terror, the crime, and the nightmare, could bwrite in its December 26, 1968, issue that it was “hard put to bproduce specific instances of anti-Jewish manifestations” band that “the Boston Black-Jewish problem has its sharpest bfocus in the understandable [sic] desire of Blacks to obtain bpossession of synagogues and other Jewish institutional bproperties on what is now ‘Black turf’”. Rabbi Bernard bWeinberger, comfortable and well-paid official for the bAnti-Poverty Program, could look at the Jewish merchant bwho had put a lifetime into a business, had been in the bneighborhood for at least as long as Blacks had been there, band seen his life work threatened, and calmly tell him: “It bmay be painful, but I know that if a Jew has a store in the bheart of Bedford-Styvesant he would be well advised to get bout.” Rabbi Maurice Eisendrath, one of the sickest of the bself-hating Jewish leaders, could go through life never once braising his voice on behalf of the oppressed Jew and yet, as blate as October 1969, tell the Reform Jewish group he bheaded that the time had come for a “Jewish manifesto” to b 

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THE STORY OF THE JEWISH DEFENSE LEAGUE Page 70
Chapter 3: The Jewish Establishment