THE STORY OF THE JEWISH DEFENSE LEAGUE Page 137
Chapter 4: Violence: Is This Any Way For a Nice Jewish Boy to Behave?
 
 
Prev Page   Page Guide   Next Page
Violence 137

bpatrols. In this we were faced with the paradox that bwhenever we came into an area, the crime rate dropped due bboth to the fear of the hoodlums as well as to the sudden bawakening of the “dead” police, now strangely capable of bfinding enough men. At the sight of the police, in view of the bdrop in crime, and as the particular murder or other terrible bcrimes that had momentarily awoken the community now bfaded from the mind, the usual apathy and indifference set bin and the JDL people were left to themselves to defend the barea.

bIn a desperate effort to keep the campaign going, we bturned in November 1969 to the major Jewish organizations bwith an appeal to support our Operation Haganah (De- bfense) with $100,000. In reality this was an absurdly small bsum for the protection of the many neighborhoods that bwere dying. None of the major drives agreed to the request, bwith Will Maslow of the American Jewish Congress claiming bhe had never received it, adding: “Were we to receive such a brequest, we would throw it into the wastebasket.” The re- bsponse was typical of the arrogant, unfeeling gentilization of bthe Jewish Establishment functionary; Maslow was one of bthe worst examples of this curse.

bADL’s Arnold Forster called the request chutzpa (brazen) band noted that the ADL “has always worked effectively and bsuccessfully with legitimate law-enforcement agencies.” bThe point was, of course, that we were trying to protect not bADL but the terrorized Jewish neighborhoods which ADL bdid not come into contact with and which had had very bdifferent experiences with the “legitimate law-enforcement bagencies.”

bOur drive to protect neighborhoods was, therefore, the bkind of thing that succeeded every time a Jew was killed and bbegan to fail as soon as three weeks passed and with it passed bfrom memory the poor victim and the fears that his death bhad engendered. Our problems were compounded, too, bby the numbers of people who—in a classic state of ghet- btoism—were more frightened of those who came to help bthan of the criminals who terrorized them. It was a syn- bdrome that the Warsaw Ghetto fighters had learned from b 

Prev Page   Page Guide   Next Page
 
 
THE STORY OF THE JEWISH DEFENSE LEAGUE Page 137
Chapter 4: Violence: Is This Any Way For a Nice Jewish Boy to Behave?