THEY MUST GO Page 11
Chapter 1: Togetherness in Israel
 
 
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CHAPTER 1

 

Togetherness in Israel

 

“It is a sin for a man to delude his neighbor; it is a crime to delude himself.”
The Rabbi of Kotsk

bIn 1973, to commemorate the twenty-fifth anniversary of the bState of Israel, the government issued a pamphlet titled Arabs in bIsrael. The introduction to the pamphlet reads as follows:

The Israeli Arabs

bSince the creation of the State of Israel its minority bpopulation has grown from 150,000 to 400,000. During the b25 years of statehood remarkable accomplishments in many bfields have been achieved by this minority.

bThe principle of equal rights for the Arabs of Israel, pro- bclaimed in the Declaration of Independence, has indeed been re- balized. The minorities enjoy religious freedom, full voting brights and the right of founding political organizations, bboth nationally and locally.

bThe educational system has developed considerably. bThe number of students and pupils has grown from 10,000 bon the eve of the foundation of the State, to 125,000 today. b10,000 students attend secondary schools, and more than b1,000 study at institutes of higher learning.

bThe Arab village has changed its face since the cre- bation of the State. In the framework of two five-year plans bbasic services were established: roads, water, electricity, bschools, health centers and other institutions of public in- bterest. The completion of these services marked the begin- bning of the industrialization of the Arab village. Factories band workshops, which also employ Arab women, were bopened; modern, mechanized agricultural systems were in- btroduced, which enable a more efficient and intensive ex- bploitation and thus a higher yield. 45,000 (11,250 acres) bdunams are now being irrigated by artificial means, as b 

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THEY MUST GO Page 11
Chapter 1: Togetherness in Israel