THEY MUST GO Page 12
Chapter 1: Togetherness in Israel
 
 
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12 THEY MUST GO

bcompared to 8,000 (2,000 acres) dunams before the intro- bduction of the new systems.

bThe socio-economic development of this section of the bpopulation greatly advances its integration into all fields of blife of the State of Israel.

 

bAn idyllic description of Jewish-Arab togetherness in Israel.

bIt is three years later, March 30, 1976. Nine A.M. The bGalilee, northern Israel, home of 300,000 Israeli Arabs. The vil- blage of Sakhnin, a model of social and economic progress since b1948. It has good roads, electricity, water, schools, appliances, btelevision sets in every home. It has “greatly advanced its inte- bgration into all fields of life of the State of Israel.”

bMore than 1,000 equal citizens of Israel—Arabs—are in the bstreet facing a small number of police and soldiers. It is “Land bDay,” and the crowd grows larger by the minute. “Falastin, bFalastin!” (“Palestine, Palestine!”), the mob roars. Other bchants and shouts are heard: “The Galilee is Arab!” “We will bfree the Galilee with blood and spirit!” Rocks are suddenly bthrown in the direction of the soldiers and police. The small bgroup of security men stare in disbelief and growing ner- bvousness. A fiery Molotov cocktail smashes against a wall a few byards away. More and heavier stones, flaming torches, lighted bcans of gasoline, and by now the soldiers are surrounded by a bgrowing circle of hate-filled faces. “Our villages do not belong to bIsrael,” shouts a young Arab. “We belong to the State of bPalestine!”

bThe Israeli papers report what happened:

b“The dams burst. ‘We are all Fatah,’ men and women bshouted in chorus, even as they threw stones and other objects at bthe police. The police fired warning shots into the air which only bincreased the agitation. The rioters began to move toward the bpolice and soldiers, threatening to trample them. Not even the bpointing of the rifles at them stopped the mob. ‘They’re boverrunning us,’ the police shouted into their radios” (Maariv, bMarch 31, 1976).

b“The mob wandered through the main street, raining bstones, torches, and firebombs on the military and police vehi- bcles. Some of the excited youth wanted to set up roadblocks. bOthers moved closer to the security forces—with clear intent to bburn the vehicles. In face of the dangerous situation the soldiers b 

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THEY MUST GO Page 12
Chapter 1: Togetherness in Israel