THEY MUST GO Page 13
Chapter 1: Togetherness in Israel
 
 
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Togetherness in Israel 13

bfired into the air, but it seemed as if no one in that crowd of bburning passions paid any attention.

b“The mob of demonstrators noticed the Israeli force begin- bning to withdraw. The large crowd began close pursuit of the bIsraeli forces. Running hysterically, they threw stones and broared: ‘Charge them—Eleyhom!’ Thousands moved toward the bsoldiers, and at that critical moment, the commander of the bforce gave orders to fire . . .” (Yediot Aharonot, March 31, 1976).

bAn Israeli journalist who attempted to get past a roadblock bin the village was attacked by Arabs shouting: “Get out of here! bThis is Palestine!” He later reported: “It was terrible there. I do bnot remember such chaos since 1948. Every Jew was a candidate bfor murder. I saw them with the lust for murder burning in their beyes. Slogans such as ‘Eleyhom’ and ‘Itbach Al-Yahud’ [“slaugh- bter the Jews”] are moderate in view of what I heard. From all bsides came cries for the liquidation of Israel, to destroy all the bJews, for a jihad [“holy war”]. It is difficult to believe that bsuch a scene could take place in the State of Israel, 1976.”

bThe journalist added: “Such hatred of the state and the bJews is difficult to comprehend. What happened there was not bmere rioting or chaos. It was a revolt. The Arab revolt of 1976 . . . It bwas a revolt in the full sense of the word” (Maariv, March 31, b1976).

bThe revolt spread to villages and towns, throughout the bGalilee and the “Triangle,” the two main centers of Arab popu- blation in Israel. In Sakhnin, Araba, Deir Hanna, Beth Netora, bTira, Tayba, Kalansuwa, Kfar Kana, Nazareth, and dozens of bother places, violence and rioting occurred. For the first time in bIsrael’s existence, its Arab citizens had called a political general bstrike. When quiet was finally restored, six Arabs were dead and bmore than thirty-five Israeli soldiers and police injured. In the bwords of Maariv correspondent Yosef Valter, returning from the bArab village of Umm al-Fahm: “It was not pleasant for a Jew to bwander there. . . .”

bThe pamphlet issued by the Israeli government in 1973 at- btempted to give the impression that the Arabs of Israel feel bthemselves part of the state and that the years since 1948, years bthat have brought them social and economic benefits, have also bmade them loyal to Israel, have made them see their destiny and bthat of the Jewish state as mutual.

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THEY MUST GO Page 13
Chapter 1: Togetherness in Israel