THEY MUST GO Page 53
Chapter 3: Of Declarations and Independence
 
 
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CHAPTER 3

 

Of Declarations and
Independence

 

bOn 5 Iyar, in the year 5708—May 14, 1948—David Ben- bGurion stood in Tel Aviv and read a historic document to a bpacked hall. It was the Declaration of the Establishment of the bState of Israel, its Declaration of Independence. In it the State of bIsrael pledged that: “It will ensure complete equality of social band political rights to all its inhabitants, irrespective of religion, brace or sex.” It also stated: “We appeal . . . to the Arab inhabi- btants of the State of Israel to preserve peace and participate in bthe upbuilding of the state on the basis of full and equal bcitizenship. . . .”

bIt would be pleasant to think that the Arab and Jew can bshare full and equal citizenship in a Jewish State of Israel. But bit is infinitely more important just to think, clearly and honestly; bfor the Jewish state that was established by the Declaration of bIndependence makes that document a model of schizophrenia, bcorrectly mirroring the ideologically confused people who wrote bit. Consider the other parts of the declaration, its opening, ma- bjor, and moving paragraphs.

b“Eretz Yisrael was the birthplace of the Jewish people. . . . bAfter being forcibly exiled from their land the people kept faith bwith it throughout their dispersion and never ceased to pray and bhope for their return to it and for the restoration in it of their bpolitical freedom. . . .

b“In the year 5657 [1897] . . . the First Zionist Congress bconvened and proclaimed the right of the Jewish people to national brebirth in its own country. . . .
 

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THEY MUST GO Page 53
Chapter 3: Of Declarations and Independence