THEY MUST GO Page 54
Chapter 3: Of Declarations and Independence
 
 
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54 THEY MUST GO

b“On the 29th November 1947, the United Nations General bAssembly passed a resolution calling for the establishment of a bJewish State in Eretz Yisrael. This recognition by the United Na- btions of the right of the Jewish People to establish their state is ir- brevocable. This right is the natural right of the Jewish people to be bmasters of their own fate, like all other nations, in their own sov- bereign state.

b“Accordingly we, members of the People’s Council . . . bhereby declare the establishment of a Jewish State in Eretz bYisrael to be known as the State of Israel.

b“The State of Israel will be open for Jewish immigration and bfor the Ingathering of the Exiles. . . .”

bNote the innumerable clear statements of what Israel is bmeant to be. The land is “the birthplace of the Jewish people.” bThe first words of the declaration of the state set the tone. It is bthe birthplace of the Jew—not the Arab—and it is the Jews who bwere “exiled from their land”; it is the Jews “who kept faith bwith it” and “never ceased to pray and hope for their return.” bCan we seriously expect the Arab to feel equal or to have a share bin such a state? A declaration of independence that he is ex- bpected to see as his own begins by speaking of the land as the bbirthplace of the Jewish people. But he is not a Jew. The decla- bration speaks of an exile and a dream of return, but the Arab bwas not exiled, and if anything the dream of return of the Jew bwas the hope of making the Arab a minority. For the Arab who bdreamed of Jews not returning, the Jewish dream is a nightmare!

bWhen the Israeli Arab is told to rise for “his” national an- bthem, “Hatikvah” (the “hope”), and sing of “the Jewish soul byearning” and “the hope of 2,000 years,” can he be expected to bfeel empathy? Indeed, Israel’s resident self-hater, Uri Avnery, bproposed in 1975 to change the anthem. His reason made beminently good sense—if you were an anti-Zionist: the song’s bmotif of Jewish longing for Israel is not acceptable to Israel’s bArabs. When the Israeli Arab looks upon the happy revelers on bIsraeli Independence Day, celebrating, in effect, the Arab defeat band the displacement of an Arab majority of Palestine by a Jew- bish majority of Israel, can he be seriously expected to join in? bWhen, in the words of the Declaration of Independence, the bLaw of Return opens the gates “for Jewish immigration” and bnot Arab influx, for the cousins of the residents of Tel Aviv but b 

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THEY MUST GO Page 54
Chapter 3: Of Declarations and Independence