THEY MUST GO Page 80
Chapter 4: Israeli Arabs: Fathers and Sons (and Daughters)
 
 
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80 THEY MUST GO

bwanted: Knesset votes and submission. Of course, the old men bhated the Jews, but their guiding light was “What is good for bme?” They had little patience with and less understanding of bnational aspirations, and, of course, any talk of social and eco- bnomic reform was anathema to them.

bThe Israeli authorities in those years followed a two- bpronged policy: a military administration that severely restrict- bed movement and unauthorized political activity, and, on the bother hand, a close working relationship with the old men of the bhamullas. Large amounts of money went into patriarchal pockets, band development funds were generously granted to “deserving” bvillages. The Labor Party ingeniously created two Arab b“parties,” both faithful hamulla-led puppets, known as Progress band Development and the List of Bedouins and Villagers. But all bIsraeli parties tried their hand at buying Arab votes through the bvenal old men. Thus, few found it odd that the Jewish National bReligious Party was able to garner votes in Arab villages. It was bhardly ideology but rather a clear indication of the real reason bfor the apparent Arab “acceptance of” and “identification with” bthe state of the Jews. It was not loyalty to Israel but an “Uncle bAhmed” mentality typical of early stages of minority submission.

bOf course, it had to end. The fraud of Israeli Arab accep- btance of Israel was built on the fact of the feudal structure of the bArab villages. But the days of that reactionary anachronism bwere numbered, and ironically, it was the Israeli government bthat, having the most to gain from its perpetuation, destroyed it.

bThere is nothing more menacing to entrenched, con- bservative feudalists than social and economic change, but that is bprecisely what Israeli society and governmental policies brought babout in the villages. The very Arab educational revolutions of bwhich Israel boasts have destroyed the authority of the hamulla bleaders by creating an educated, radical class that questions all bthe social, political, and economic axioms upon which the ruling bpatriarchs based their authority. It is not only that education bopened up windows to the world and allowed the young Arab to bsee a vast spectrum of other social structures. It is not only that beducation exposed young Arabs to radical, leftist, revolutionary bviews that called for the overthrow of feudal privilege. It is bdeeper than that.

bEducation—along with the fact that the young Arab was b 

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THEY MUST GO Page 80
Chapter 4: Israeli Arabs: Fathers and Sons (and Daughters)