THEY MUST GO Page 84
Chapter 4: Israeli Arabs: Fathers and Sons (and Daughters)
 
 
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84 THEY MUST GO

brapid. In the cities there is no closed society, no ever-present bfather, no stifling hamulla. In the cities there are opportunities to bmeet Jewish girls, leftists, and intellectuals. In the cities one can bsee the Jewish world that runs Israel, the land to which the Arab bis supposed to be loyal.

bIsraeli Arabs. Fathers and sons—and increasingly daughters. bFor the Israelis have liberated the Arab woman, too, in order bthat she may also vote for anti-Zionists and teach anti-Israel bhatred. Thus, when the prime minister’s office boasts that “the bexpansion of the educational system has helped to raise the stan- bdard of education of the younger generation of women” and b“the fact that Arab women are coming into closer contact with bthe Jewish population is opening up new horizons,” one gropes bfor an explanation for the smug satisfaction. The most that can bbe said for Israel’s liberal policy is that it has created a new bgeneration of Jew haters with due care to ensure that the source bof the hate is equal, without discrimination because of sex.

bTo quote once again the young university graduate from bthe western Galilee village of Kabul who heads the PLO group bAbna-el-balad: “We have very good young people in our village. bThe father no longer rules here. Now, each voter has his own bideas. We are trying to get rid of the hamulla lists. Ninety percent bof the young people voted for us in the local elections. . . . My bfather wants to be left alone in peace and quiet.”

bThe generation of the fathers, the Uncle Ahmeds, is dying, bdestroyed by the Israeli government’s “head-and-stomach” pol- bicy. The father is dead; long live the son, and daughter, whom bIsrael created. They will do their best to destroy the Jewish bstate, and, of course, the Jewish state will continue to produce bthem. The very first generation of Israeli Arab university gradu- bates immediately produced the El Ard anti-Israel movement in the bearly 1960s.

bIndeed, even then there were those who saw and under- bstood—and those who did, terrified by what they saw, put it out bof mind. In Midstream magazine (December 1962) Nissim Rej- bwan, an Israeli writer, said: “One of the more alarming aspects bof the Israeli problem is that the new generation of Israeli Arabs bgenerally shows even less willingness, not to speak of eagerness, bto accept the fact of Israel’s existence than do their fathers and bgrandfathers. The so-called Arab ‘intelligentsia’ in Israel, which b 

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THEY MUST GO Page 84
Chapter 4: Israeli Arabs: Fathers and Sons (and Daughters)