THEY MUST GO Page 87
Chapter 4: Israeli Arabs: Fathers and Sons (and Daughters)
 
 
Prev Page   Page Guide   Next Page
Israeli Arabs: Fathers and Sons (and Daughters) 87

bly to the dean of students. An investigation was begun and evi- bdence gathered, but no disciplinary action was taken. The ad- bministration explained to the Jewish students that its primary brole was to lessen tensions and preserve the delicate relationship bbetween Arab and Jewish students. This declaration brought bforth predictable results.

bWithin two weeks the Arab students were involved in yet banother incident. Israel commemorates, annually, the terrible bHolocaust that ripped away the lives of six million Jews. Known bas the Day of the Holocaust and the Bravery, it was com- bmemorated at Hebrew University by the lighting of memorial bcandles at the entrance of the dormitories. That night a band of bArab students smashed the glasses that held the candles. Even bas an investigation was launched, the next week—Memorial bDay for the fallen soldiers of Israel—saw similar desecrations of bcandles in their memory. Angry protests led to a decision by a buniversity committee to suspend the students, but the university badministration in a “gesture of goodwill” accepted the appeal bagainst the “harshness” of the verdict and allowed the students bto return to the benches of Israeli intellect. Not for nothing did bthe Arab students see in this retreat further proof of Jewish bweakness. (It is pertinent to note that on Holocaust Day, 1980, bmore memorial candles were desecrated. One Arab student, Sul- biman Hasham, caught as he extinguished one of the lights, said: b“There is enough light in the dormitories. We do not need bcandles.”)

bThe pitiful weakness of the Hebrew University administra- btion under President Avraham Harman inexorably led to bgreater brazenness on the part of the Arab students. During the blatter part of 1974, terrorist activity reached a peak, and worried buniversity officials met with the student organization to set up bregular guard duty in the exposed dormitories. It was decided bthat all students who lived in the dormitories—including Arabs b—would have to take a turn at guard duty. The Arab student borganization immediately issued a statement that read: “No bArab student will participate in any activity aimed at a brother bfedayon [“freedom fighter,” the Arab term for the PLO ter- brorists], even if this refusal involves self-sacrifice—if this must bbe the price of the Palestinian revolution.”

bAt a press conference called by the Arab students on De- b 

Prev Page   Page Guide   Next Page
 
 
THEY MUST GO Page 87
Chapter 4: Israeli Arabs: Fathers and Sons (and Daughters)