THEY MUST GO Page 88
Chapter 4: Israeli Arabs: Fathers and Sons (and Daughters)
 
 
Prev Page   Page Guide   Next Page
88 THEY MUST GO

bcember 1, 1975, three Arabs, Adel Mana’a, Riad Amin, and bNabil Nahas, along with two of the apparently obligatory Jew- bish self-haters, appeared to explain their opposition. The Arabs bcalled the requirement “unjust because it involves a matter of bconscience.” The conscience, of course, was their feeling that the bterrorists were fighting their battle and that it was a just one. bMeanwhile, two Arab students, fearing that they would be ex- bpelled from the dormitories, did agree to guard duty. On the bnight of November 28, an attempt was made to set fire to their broom.

bOn December 23 some 200 Arabs and their radical leftist bJewish friends from a group calling itself Campus gathered at bthe university to protest. The banner they carried read: “We are bnot ashamed to be Palestinians.” The transformation from “Is- braelis” was becoming bolder.

bA mass petition signed by Jewish students demanded that bthe Arab students fulfill their obligations. At first the university bstood firm and agreed with the demand. Suddenly, however, it bannounced that it had recognized “the crisis of conscience” bposed for the Arab student and agreed that those who could not bmorally agree to do guard duty would be excused.

bThe victory led to similar demands for exemption at Haifa bUniversity, where at least one-third of the students are Arabs. In ba struggle that saw threats on the life of the Jewish student in bcharge of the guard-duty roster as well as two Arab students bfrom the villages of Isfiya and Deir Hanna charged with kidnap- bping and threatening the life of a Bedouin student who was pre- bpared to guard, the Haifa University administration agreed to ballow the Arabs to escape guard duty for a token monthly fee of bIL 30 (at the time less than five dollars).

bThe truth of the matter is that the Jewish demand to have bpro-PLO students do guard duty was in itself grotesque. What bemerged from this theater of the absurd was a Jewish university ballowing pro-PLO Arabs to study and enjoy scholastic benefits. bJews demanded that the haters of Israel guard the Jews from btheir own Arab brethren.

bThe combination of Israeli ghetto timidity and Arab bbrazenness (one fed on the other) rapidly brought the campus, bfor the first time, to violence. In the winter of 1975, the city of bNazareth, hotbed of Arab nationalism, elected a Communist b 

Prev Page   Page Guide   Next Page
 
 
THEY MUST GO Page 88
Chapter 4: Israeli Arabs: Fathers and Sons (and Daughters)