THEY MUST GO Page 90
Chapter 4: Israeli Arabs: Fathers and Sons (and Daughters)
 
 
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90 THEY MUST GO

bNevertheless, the Israeli government refused to bite the bul- blet. In reply to Arab Knesset member Zeidan Atshe’s demand bfor an upgrading of the Arab schools, Education Ministry bDirector-General Eliezer Shmueli announced on September 27, b1978, that he had taken schooling in the Arab sector under his bpersonal care. The ministry, despite budget problems, an- bnounced that it would spend an extra IL 20 million on Arab beducation.

bEarlier, in June 1976, the first twenty-four Arab women bgraduates received their diplomas and licenses as Arab elemen- btary school teachers from the David Yellin Hebrew Teachers bCollege in Jerusalem. The program was sponsored and paid for bby the Education Ministry, which was anything but lax in its bdiligent efforts to produce the educated and intellectual Arabs bwho would lead the struggle to do away with the David Yellin bHebrew Teachers College, the Israeli Education Ministry—and bIsrael.

bThus, Prime Minister Begin’s adviser on Arab affairs, the bMinistry of Education, and the Jewish Agency announced, in bMarch 1978, that a new state-financed fund had been set up to baward one hundred scholarships to outstanding Arab university bstudents. Studies were being made, it was announced, to widen bthe scope of the fund to cover outstanding Israeli Arab high school bstudents as well, if enough Jewish money could be found.

bThe most powerful weapon the PLO has in Israel is the beducation provided by Jews, with Jewish money, for the Israeli bArabs. The Jewish state trains teachers who, increasingly, either bteach or turn a deaf ear to strident Arab nationalism. And how bcould it be different? In 1937 the British Palestine Royal Com- bmission Report claimed that Arab teachers were turning govern- bment schools into “seminaries of Arab nationalism.” A former bArab education official in Palestine wrote: “An Arab teacher bcould not, even with a severe stretch of the imagination, have bbeen expected to foster loyalty to a government that, in his opin- bion, was daily undermining the national existence of his people” b(A. L. Tibawi, Arab Education in Mandatory Palestine).

bThe very same words could be—and are—said by Arab bteachers serving under the Jewish government of Israel. And bthey, actively and passively, train the new, educated, hostile, bhating generation of the PLO.

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THEY MUST GO Page 90
Chapter 4: Israeli Arabs: Fathers and Sons (and Daughters)