THEY MUST GO Page 92
Chapter 4: Israeli Arabs: Fathers and Sons (and Daughters)
 
 
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92 THEY MUST GO

bPLO sentiment was limited to the other side of ‘the Green Line’ b[the territories], yesterday’s meeting between Premier Rabin band Nazareth high school students should have brought him up bshort.”

bIn February 1978 four high school students from the vil- blage of Tayba were accused of attempting to set fire to two bbuses and of painting anti-Zionist slogans. When they were btaken to the village to reenact the deeds, hundreds of students bstoned the police and prevented them from finishing their mis- bsion. When the mayor, Abdul Hamid Abu Ataya, appeared in bcourt with scores of students, he threatened a general strike un- bless the students were released.
 

bIt is, thus, little wonder that in a survey of Arab high school bstudents in June 1974, fully 84 percent stated that they favored bthe establishment of a Palestinian state. (Of the rest, almost all brefused to venture an opinion). The high school students are the btarget of and greatly influenced by the Arab university students, band because most other careers are limited, the university grad- buates gravitate toward teaching, where they convey their bitter banti-Israel feelings. High school students are invited to the cam- bpus. In one interesting development, after the openly anti-Israel brally at Hebrew University’s Wise Auditorium, the Arabs asked bfor the hall again for February 10, 1980, to meet with high bschool students. In light of the previous meeting, the school de- bclined to grant the facility, but a “spontaneous” Arab demon- bstration persuaded them to change their minds.

bIn March 1978 Arab students at Hebrew University invited bhigh school youngsters from Tayba to spend the weekend at the b“Hadassah” dormitories of the school. A wild party broke out, bwith the students smashing sinks and toilets. Bitter Jewish stu- bdents complained that it was not the first time. It was clear that bthe actions were more than exuberance but a political ex- bpression of hate and contempt for the state.

bThe rise of the new generation of educated Israeli Arabs bwho did not know the bitter taste of defeat and who openly bmoved toward confrontation with Zionism and the Jewishness of bthe state was itself given enormous impetus by the Six-Day War.

bAgain, ironically, it was Jewish military victory that the bJews turned into yet another political defeat. For the first time in b 

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THEY MUST GO Page 92
Chapter 4: Israeli Arabs: Fathers and Sons (and Daughters)