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Chapter 6: The Ultimate Contradiction
 
 
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bhe recognizes a state called “Israel,” which today is a Jewish bstate. But the “best” of the Arabs, the most “moderate,” the bmost willing to accept the right of Israel, the Jewish state of btoday, to exist, do not recognize that right as absolute. They recognize bthe right of Israel, the Jewish state, to exist as long as a majority bof its citizens prefer an “Israel” as the “Jewish state.” But the bmost “moderate” and good Arabs are not Zionists. Should there beventually emerge an Arab majority in the country, every one of bthem—swearing loyalty to “Israel”—will go to the polls and vote bout its Jewish character. They will, undoubtedly, vote to change bits name too, but that is not really relevant. Every Arab in Israel breserves for himself the right, as a democratic majority, to babolish the Jewish-Zionist nature of the country that he would now bdominate. Every Arab demands the right at least to work peace- bfully toward the day when the Law of Return is abolished and bIsrael will be a de facto Arab state.

bThe almost hysterical obeisances to “democracy” on the bpart of Israelis and their frantic insistence that Arabs enjoy de- bmocracy in an Israel that is committed to democracy are simply bastounding. Clearly, the more they pledge themselves to “democracy,” the bmore bound they are to their commitment; the more impossible it will be for bthem to deny the Arab the right to put an end democratically to the Jewish bstate. The Western-influenced Jewish Hellenists of our time dig btheir own pit of doom. Thus Labor Party Secretary-General bHaim Bar-Lev, visiting South Africa in June 1980, was asked to bcompare the minority situations in South Africa and Israel. Ac- bcording to the Jewish Telegraphic Agency (June 10, 1980): b“Bar-Lev observed that while he was not familiar with the South bAfrican situation, he felt that there was no comparison. In Is- brael, where there was equality before the law, both Arabs and bJews had to vote and sat in the same Knesset.”

bIs Bar-Lev a fool or a knave? The thought of a comparison bwith the pariah of the Western World—South Africa—turns bhim into a defender of democracy and of the rights of Arabs to bdo away with Zionism, as they sit “in the same Knesset” with bthe future Jewish minority. And so, in the end, he digs his own bpit. He deceives not one Arab but contributes to the dismal Jew- bish self-delusion that will explode in our faces one day in the not bterribly distant future.

bOn June 27, 1980, the former Labor Party director-general b 

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Chapter 6: The Ultimate Contradiction