THEY MUST GO Page 142
Chapter 7: One Worlds
 
 
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142 THEY MUST GO

btionhood, culture, ethnicity language, and destiny to the minor- bity, vowing to erase the sovereignty of the majority state; it is bpossible for the majority in the state to grow increasingly bisolated and bitterly attacked throughout the world; it is pos- bsible for the minority to sense the growing weakness, insecurity, band divisions in the state, even as in the territory bordering the bareas in which they live offers have been made for autonomy, and bwith all that: it is possible through goodwill and economic and bsocial progress for both peoples to live together peacefully, with bthe minority feeling loyalty and civic attachment to the state bthat belongs to the other, with no dreams of someday taking it bover.

bIf I were an Arab, I would laugh. Being a Jew, I weep. The state bis the vehicle and home of the nation. From time immemorial bthe two have been synonymous. The city-state of Greece was the bhome of a particular people. All the citizens (with the rarest of bexceptions) were of the same nation, religion, culture, language. bAgain, with the rarest of exceptions, there were no German- bAthenians, Italian-Athenians, Hispanic-Athenians, or Afro- bAthenians in Athens, no “hyphenated” citizens. All Athenians bwere Greek; all came from the same background with common bblood and shared historical experience. This was the natural band normal state of affairs in the ancient world, and logical it bwas.

bThe nation, a collection of tribes, themselves derived from bclans and families, was one large common family joined by the bthickest and most binding of elements: blood. Everywhere it was bthe same. The Land of Moab was the state of the people of bMoab and of no one else. In it, all spoke a common language, bMoabite; in it, all worshiped a common god, Kmosh; in it, all bremembered their common ancestor, Lot. No two nations b“shared” Moab. It was normal and logical. A family needs a bplace to live and be safe from the elements; it acquires a house. bThe house belongs to that family and to no one else. It is the bfamily that establishes the rules and regulations of the house. It bis their name that is given to the house. So was it with the ex- btended family, the nation. The nation gave its name to the land, band strangers who arrived did not become citizens and coowners bof the land merely by dwelling there. It was the one family-na- btion that owned the land and that established the rules. One b 

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THEY MUST GO Page 142
Chapter 7: One Worlds