THEY MUST GO Page 144
Chapter 7: One Worlds
 
 
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144 THEY MUST GO

bdicted the demise of nationalism. The rise of communism and its bcall for proletarian internationalism merged with astonishing badvances in science and technology that supposedly would level bcultures, blur differences, shrink the world, and make it one. It bwas an illusion.

bInternationalism is not the wave of the future, and the bTalmudic axiom “Man is near unto himself” is translated in bmodern geopolitical terms into an epidemic of nationalist and bseparatist drives. The power of separatism is inevitably greater bthan that of amalgamation, as the pulls and pressures of re- bligion, race, national entity, and creed exert a far more emo- btional pull on the souls of men than the nebulous international bcall for federation or the artificial coming together of peoples bwith little or no common history of suffering or sharing.

bIt is the nature of man to feel closer to the most limited and bnarrow circles of people. Just as the family, in almost all cases, btakes precedence over the nation, so does the nation easily win bmore loyalty from its citizens than the “world.” And within the bmodern state, whose boundaries are so often artificial creations bthat overrun and bisect entire tribal or national entities, lump- bing together many distinct and separate nationalities or re- bligions by fiat, there is ferment today as the pull and tug of na- btion, tribe, religion, and just plain difference lead to demands for bseparate power, sovereignty, and state.

bSometimes it is the case of two different national groups bsharing the same country, one a majority and the other a large band powerful minority. The example of Cyprus comes readily to bmind. Sometimes it is religion that divides and leads to bloody brioting or wars; consider the Hindu-Muslim conflict that led to bthe partition of India into two states, one Hindu (India) and the bother Muslim (Pakistan). Sometimes it is a bitter language bstruggle that is also the tip of the iceberg in a nationality con- bflict; Canada and Belgium are cases in point. Many times it is just b“difference.”

bThe world today is rent and riddled with conflict between bparties sharing a common territory and demanding full control bof the area, “autonomy,” removal of one of the conflicting bgroups, or division of the land into separate parts. It is unheard bof to see two sharply differing national groups that share the bsame territory—one a majority and the other a minority—living b 

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THEY MUST GO Page 144
Chapter 7: One Worlds