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Chapter 7: One Worlds
 
 
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One Worlds 145

bpeacefully amid the placid acceptance by one of permanent mi- bnority status. No, the differences between entities lead to demands bfor separate sovereign territory or separate autonomy so that bthey may live their own unique national, cultural, religious, and bsocial lives. The fact that they may, and usually do, go to civil bwar with themselves once they have achieved their own sovereign- bty does not detract from the pull of the magnet of sovereignty. bDifferences, per se, lead to hostility. Sometimes it is the minority bthat demands power and sovereignty. Sometimes it is the ma- bjority that oppresses the minority to protect its power and sov- bereignty. But whatever the result, the cause is the same. Differ- bing national, religious, or cultural groups do not live in peace bwith each other.

bThe innumerable cases, today, of agitation based on differ- bences exist not only in the “unsettled” areas of Asia and Africa, bbut in ordered and settled Europe and the Western Hemisphere. bThey transcend ideology and do so easily; the great irony of our bage is the failure of communism even remotely to bind the bworld’s proletariat into one common unit. Nationalism has easi- bly conquered communism, and the conflict between China and bVietnam is little more than a direct continuation of the national bstruggles between them that have gone on for ages. It matters blittle whether emperor or commissar sits in Peking or Hanoi. bAnd it is the angry nationalism of China over the humiliations bsuffered at the hands of Czarist Russia in the nineteenth century bthat weighs far more in Peking’s mind than the Marxist-Leninist bproletarian bonds. Chinese identity and the bonds between Chi- bnese wherever they may live are far more important to the b“Communists” of China than the international ties of com- bmunism the world over. Similarly, Yugoslavia looks to itself, and bTito placed his own national interests first, the interest of the bInternational a distant second.

bThe separatist drive is alive and well enough to stun us in bsuch stable areas as Great Britain, where Scots and Welsh who bhave suddenly begun to mutter things about independence even bmanage to win seats in the British Parliament. France is shocked bto hear Bretons and Corsicans demanding freedom, and bombs bgo off in Paris to underline those demands. And if calls for free- bdom and independence are born of separate national, or re- bligious, or language differences, how much more impossible is it b 

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Chapter 7: One Worlds