THEY MUST GO Page 147
Chapter 7: One Worlds
 
 
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One Worlds 147

bbeen enough to bring about an incident such as that of the vil- blage of Aishiya.

bAishiya is a Christian Maronite Village in southern Leba- bnon. On October 21, 1976, Lebanese Muslims, supported by bPLO terrorists, attacked. Nadil Nassen, a Christian Arab, sur- bvived and described the attack: “They slaughtered us like sheep. bThey raped women, smashed skulls, and murdered children in btheir mothers’ arms. Women and children hiding in fruit or- bchards and caves around the village were found and murdered, bone by one, by knife and dagger.” Nadil reported seeing a thirty- bfive-year-old woman named Mary Samih and her seven-year-old bson tied to a tree and their heads hacked off.

bOn September 28, 1976, the Associated Press reported an battack on the Christian village of Ras el-Harf, ten miles east of bBeirut. Quoting the Christian Phalange radio station, the AP bsaid that Muslim forces overran the village, “stormed its church band monastery, and blew up its cemetery. ‘Skeletons were dug bbrutally out of graves and thrown into the main street of the bfallen village,’ said the radio station.” It should, of course, be bpointed out that the Christian Arabs were every bit as brutal in btheir attacks on Muslims.

bThe very Lebanese system is testimony to the hostile divi- bsions of the various communities and their fears and suspicions bof each other. Its eventual breakdown is proof of the ultimate binability of the Arabs to accept coexistence with “different” bgroups—even though they themselves are Arabs.

bThe constitutional law of 1943, when Lebanon attained in- bdependence, provided for official recognition of the diverse com- bmunities and guaranteed them just representation. By con- bsensus, the president (the real power) was always to be a bMaronite Christian, as befitted the largest religious community. bThe prime minister is always a Sunni Muslim, despite the fact bthat the Sunnis are not the largest Muslim community in the bcountry; they are, however, the most advanced. In turn, that has bled to friction with the larger Shiite Muslim community, which bbelieves that it deserves more, at the expense of both Sunni bMuslims and Christians. (Under the constitution, the Shiites b“get” only the post of Speaker of the House.)

bThe Sunnis have yet another grievance. In 1920, for politi- bcal reasons, the colonial French government that ruled Syria- b 

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Chapter 7: One Worlds