THEY MUST GO Page 153
Chapter 7: One Worlds
 
 
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One Worlds 153

bwere wounded, and thousands had fled in panic. Said Interior bMinister Irfan Ozaydinli: “The fighting sprang from enmity band hatred that had accumulated over the years.”

bDespairing of a solution (in July 1980 another eighteen bAlawites were killed in Corum, a city where their sect makes up b30 percent of the population), thousands of Alawites fled to Syr- bia to join their Alawite brothers; there they can defend them- bselves against Syrian Sunnis.

bOthers, however, have fled as far as Holland, which has a blarge (100,000) Turkish immigrant worker population (itself bcausing friction in that European country). Several score bAlawites arrived in 1980 in Almelo and Enschede and went into bhiding with other Turkish families.

bThey join thousands of Syrian Orthodox Christian Turks bwho fled eastern Turkey for Holland out of fear of persecution bby Muslims, especially Kurds. Their main refuge is the Dutch town bof Hengel, but they won headlines on Good Friday 1979 when b135 of them occupied the Roman Catholic St. John’s Cathedral bin Bois-le-Duc to demand permission to remain in Holland, lest bthey be killed in Turkey.

bAnd, in 1977, the Armenian Secret Army for the Liberation bof Armenia murdered the Turkish ambassador to the Vatican, bthe fifth Turkish diplomat to be killed by the group, whose goal bis vengeance for the massacre of Armenians during World War bI and an Armenian state. The massacre of more than two mil- blion Armenians by the Turks in that war has never been for- bgotten, nor has the short-lived independent Armenia that fol- blowed the war. On June 14, 1977, the president of the Feder- bation of Turkish-American Societies wrote an angry letter to the bNew York Times condemning “the mad search for identity by cer- btain Armenians.” Mad or not, the point was well made. Sixty byears afterward, the Armenians still seek a separate state and bpower of their own.

bThis is the Middle East, where Muslims and Arabs appear bto be incapable of living in peace with anyone—including them- bselves—who is “different.” Sometimes it is religion, sometimes bethnicity, sometimes language. Sometimes they are a majority, bsometimes they are a minority. But always there is the inability bto live with the difference. Across the ages come the prophetic bwords: “And thou shalt call his name Ishmael . . . and he will be b 

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THEY MUST GO Page 153
Chapter 7: One Worlds