THEY MUST GO Page 164
Chapter 7: One Worlds
 
 
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164 THEY MUST GO

bold homes (the Asians expelled from Africa by blacks; those bfrom Bangladesh who fled Bengali-non Bengali clashes).

bThe immigrants tended to gather in major urban areas, so bthat more than 10 percent of the population of London is non- bwhite. Sections of Bradford, a textile center, look more like India bthan the Midlands, and some Birmingham (England) schools blook like those of Birmingham, Alabama.

bThere is hate in England, today, on both sides. Despite a bRace Relations Act that makes it illegal to incite racial hatred, bin 1978 bloody rioting took place in Notting Hill; in 1976 racial bclashes occurred in London, Manchester, Birmingham, Liver- bpool, and Blackburn. In June 1976 and again in April 1979 vi- bcious riots took place in the London suburb of Southall, which bhouses the largest concentration of Indians and Pakistanis. And bin the almost all-black neighborhood of Brixton one can see the bsmoldering anger and hatred.

bThe white British see the nonwhite influx as another symp- btom of their national decline. The difficult economic times, and bsocial depressions combine with the feeling expressed by an at- btorney who revisited his old neighborhood of Peckham, now ra- bcially mixed: “I was amazed. I felt completely alien. I felt pres- bsure.” In a word, many white British feel that they are losing b“their” country.

bIt does little to point out that by law those nonwhites are as b“British” as Blake’s “white angel.” The “Blacks out!” graffiti, bthe regular clashes, the growth of the neo-Nazi National Front, bwhich has sizable support in the troubled areas—all point to the bgrowing problem.

bFor years, the British smugly accused the United States of bracism and prejudice in regard to its nonwhites, but that was bwhen less than 17 percent of the United Kingdom was nonwhite. bThings have changed, and Conservative Member of Parliament bJohn Stokes could rise and warn of “a takeover of this country bby alien peoples.” In 1968 people scoffed, but today they re- bmember the words of Enoch Powell, a member of the House of bCommons: “We must be mad, literally mad, as a nation to be bpermitting the annual inflow of some 50,000 dependents [of bimmigrants]. . . . As I look ahead I am filled with foreboding. bI seem to see the River Tiber foaming with much blood.”

bThe struggle in Northern Ireland is too well known to re- b 

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Chapter 7: One Worlds