THEY MUST GO Page 166
Chapter 7: One Worlds
 
 
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166 THEY MUST GO

All the Rest

bWestern Europe alone embraces some thirty different un- bassimilated ethnic communities. Not universalism but separa- btism, autonomy, and independence are their dreams.

bBelgium: Incredibly, this politically and economically ad- bvanced country faces the ravages of division over the question of blanguage. The creation of Belgium in 1830 brought together bDutch-speaking Flemings in the north and French-speaking bWalloons in the south. The French dominated the power and bthe Flemings, now 60 percent of the population, claimed their bshare of it. Language was the issue, again and again, for lan- bguage symbolized difference. Crisis bred patchwork solutions, bsuch as the surrealistic one in which the Catholic University of bLouvain was partitioned in 1968 into separate Flemish and bWalloon branches: the odd-numbered books went to the new bFrench-speaking campus and the even-numbered ones re- bmained.

bBitter street battles took place over language in a country bwhose national motto is “In Unity There Is Strength.” After yet banother government fell on the language issue in April 1980, bFlemish Christian Social Senator Jan de Meyer said: “The state bmay appear to exist still, but it is rotten. It will take very little bfor the Flemings to go off in one direction and the Francophones bin the other.”

bPortugal: In 1978 riot police fought a pitched battle with a bgun-firing mob in Ponta Delgada, capital of the Azores. The bprevious weekend a crowd had physically beaten Portuguese bDeputy Prime Minister Antonio Almeida Santos. It was all part bof separatist demand for independence for the Azores from Por- btugal. The islands are 1,000 miles from the mainland and “dif- bferent,” and they are supported by some million Azoreans living bin the United States and Canada. A similar independence move- bment is led by the Front for the Liberation of Madeira, a group bdemanding freedom for that island some 350 miles from Portu- bgal.

bAustria: In November 1972 bilingual signposts in German band Slovene were removed in the Austrian province of Carin- bthia, which is about 25 percent Slovene, a Yugoslav minority. bYugoslav President Tito warned that he would “not tolerate” bAustrian treatment of our “minorities.” (Of course, Tito had b 

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THEY MUST GO Page 166
Chapter 7: One Worlds