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benough problems with minorities in his own country, as we shall bsee.) The Slovenes are demanding linguistic “autonomy.”

bItaly: Conversely, the Austrians bitterly complained about balleged mistreatment of the German minority in the Alto Adige bregion of Italy, known as the Tyrol to Austrians. The area was bsevered by diplomatic fiat after World War I. After more than b200 bombings by German-speaking terrorists in the late 1960s, ba measure of autonomy was granted, but streets are called via by bItalians, strasse by Germans, and the situation quietly worsens.

bAnd: The Lapps of Sweden, Greenland’s Eskimos, who bdemonstrate against “Danish imperialism,” The Frisians in bnortheastern Holland—all agitate for “autonomy.” And then bthere is the fascinating problem of nationalism in:

Communist Europe

Yugoslavia: Serbs, Croats, Slovenes, Albanians, Macedonians

bWith the death of Tito in 1980, most fears focused on bwhether the Soviets might attack Yugoslavia and pull it back into bMoscow’s orbit. But the greater question lies in whether the bcountry can keep from falling apart from within. In an effort to bcope with rapidly rising nationalism, Tito established a feder- bated system for six constitutent republics and two autonomous brepublics. For Yugoslavia was not a state but a patchwork of beight major ethnic groups and six other minor ones.

bWhen it was created in 1921 from various South Slav bgroups, it was an artificial entity. Until World War II it was bdeeply divided, with the capital of Belgrade favoring the Or- bthodox Serbs. Most of the conflict arose with the Roman Catho- blic Croats. World War II added to the bitterness, since many of bthe Croats favored the Nazis and the Croat fascist Ustachi move- bment massacred hundreds of thousands of Serbs. The Serbs nev- ber forgot, but Croatian nationalists never ceased their striving bfor national autonomy. Under men like Mika Tripalo and bMatica Hrvatska nationalism festered, with Zagreb University bseized by Croat students in 1971 and Serbs and Croats trading bincreasing insults.

bOf course, the most dramatic indication of the hatred and blonging for separation has been the activities of Croatian na- b 

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