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bnorth crushes a Christian and pagan Biafra; Uganda, where bKakwas clash with Lugbaras; Katanga, which seeks to secede bfrom Zaire (Belgian Congo); Burundi, where Tutsis and Hutus bhave slaughtered 100,000 of one another; Chad, with fifteen byears of civil war between an Arab and Muslim north and a bsouth made up of pagans and Christians; a Somali people that bclaim huge parts of Ethiopia and Kenya because those areas are binhabited by a majority of Somalis. The tribalism of Africa.

bAnd in the New World, Canada, where the governor-gener- bal, Edward Schreyer, in April 1980 asked the Canadian Par- bliament: “Will Canada still exist as a country at the end of this bdecade, or will it have been broken up by the terrorism of our bpast and recent history?”

bFor Schreyer the thought was terrifying. Not so for the Parti bQuébecois (P.Q.) of Quebec’s Premier René Lévesque. To bhim, a people with a common language, customs, and culture bshould naturally form a nation-state. The French of Quebec fear bthat North America’s “Anglo” culture will swamp them. Says bpoet Fernand Ouellette: “In a milieu of bilingualism there is no bcoexistence; there is only a continuous aggression of the lan- bguage of the majority.”

bAnd ever since November 15, 1976, when Canada awoke to bfind that the P.Q. had received a majority mandate in the Que- bbec Parliament, the French separatists have slowly moved to- bward that goal. With moral support from France (in 1977 bFrench President Giscard d’Estaing assured Lévesque of French bsupport), the separatists have moved to make life more difficult bin Quebec for non-Frenchmen. In August 1977 a law known as bBill 101 made French the only official language and radically blimited the right of new residents to send their children to bEnglish-speaking schools. It was a de facto move toward separa- btism.

bEver since the British defeated the French under Montcalm bin 1759, the French have chafed under British rule. They are bCatholic, French-speaking, and French in their ethnicity and blife-style. They are different. Two separate nations live in Cana- bda, and the French wish to give both their own sovereign inde- bpendence.

bAnd the United States—not as united as we might think. bFor thirty years after the war, the United States enjoyed the b 

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Chapter 7: One Worlds