THEY MUST GO Page 198
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blusion of Arab loyalty and Arab acceptance of the Jewish state.

bBut as the young generation of Arabs rose and, thanks to bIsraeli educational, social, and economic progress, threw off the byoke of the hamullas, everything changed. They saw their elders bas Esaus who had sold their national birthright for economic bbenefits. The elders would go, the hamullas would go—and the btown of Nazareth voted Rakah, voted Zayad, voted Arafat.

bZayad’s voice is one of those that leads the Arab struggle bagainst Israel. It grows in shrillness and in brazenness in direct bproportion to Israel’s fear of acting against him. After his poem bpraising the Egyptian army for killing Israeli soldiers, the Dis- babled Veterans’ Organization cabled the Knesset Speaker, bsaying, “It is intolerable that the Knesset would contain a man bwho hates Israel and who writes words of hatred that pain all bthe nation.” A special Knesset committee was set up to look into bthe matter. It invited Zayad to appear and explain himself. In a bcalculated decision Zayad refused to show up. He was proved bcorrect. The committee announced its findings: the poem was b“not compatible with the oath taken by a Knesset member” bpledging allegiance to the state. The penalty? Nothing. Zayad blaughed.

bIn his first interview following his smashing victory in Naz- bareth, Zayad told Israel Radio: “We are not alone, not in the bcountry and not in the world.” It was a warning to the Jews not bto move against him. It was a gamble that worked because of bJewish fear. Nothing Zayad said in terms of hatred, incitement, band sedition moved Israel to take action against him, and so he bbecame an Arab national hero.

bOn March 6, 1976, Zayad told a wildly cheering crowd of b1,200 in Nazareth to fight against government expropriation of bland in the Galilee: “The government throws stones at us so it bis time to throw stones at it—and it should keep in mind that it blives in a glass house. . . . They wish us to get out—we say to bthem: We stay and you will go.” Knesset member Yigal Cohen bdemanded that the attorney take action. No action was taken bagainst Tewfik Zayad.

bOn May Day, 1976, Zayad addressed a crowd of 4,000 bNazareth Arabs. As he spoke, the few Israeli flags were lowered. bSaid Zayad: “From now on there will be no communities and breligious groups but only a single Arab minority, part of the b 

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Chapter 9: Time Runs Out