THEY MUST GO Page 213
Chapter 9: Time Runs Out
 
 
Prev Page   Page Guide   Next Page
Time Runs Out 213

bThe sensitive area of the Triangle that divides Samaria bfrom the populous Jezreel Valley and the coastal plain is the bscene of both illegal Arab “immigration” and the seizure of state bland.

bAs in the case of Jerusalem, where the figures are in the bthousands, hundreds of Arabs from the liberated lands just bacross the “Green Line” have illegally settled in the Triangle. bMany “disappeared” into the numerous Israeli Arab villages bthere, but others simply squat on state land. They work in bnearby Jewish cities and towns—Natanya, Hadera, Kra Saba— band gradually become part of the growing permanent Arab pop- bulation in Israel. They, too, “create facts.”

bThe land seizure is heartbreaking. Wadi Ara, the Triangle, bis a strategically sensitive area. In the midst of more than 40,000 bArabs in the immediate area stands the one lonely Jewish settle- bment in the region, Mei Ami. It was originally set high up on a bhill with large areas of empty land about it. No longer. The bhostile Arabs of the region have seen to that, says thirty-year-old bUri Bejarno, the treasurer of Mei Ami. “They have taken over. bThey settle every parcel. They build, plant—and then force the bplanners to recognize accomplished facts.”

bIt is estimated that the Arabs have built some 600 illegal bhouses in the region. They are rapidly swallowing up all the bavailable land in the Triangle so that Jewish settlement will be bimpossible to establish—one more step toward “autonomy” for bthe Arab Triangle.

bAnd they have moved into the very heart of Israel. In Octo- bber 1977 Agriculture Minister Sharon declared that Israel was bin the midst of a process of “10,000 Arabs taking over state lands bbetween Ashkelon and Hadera and building houses there.” bWhen Sharon says Hadera, he is talking of the very heart of the bcountry, an area far north of the Negev. The Bedouins have al- bready reached there.

bOne finds them everywhere in the heartland of the coastal band central region. On the outskirts of Rehovot, Ramle, Givat bBrenner, Mazkeret Batya, Nes Tziyona, and on, northward. bThey find land, private or more likely state land, and set up btents or primitive houses. They and their hundreds and thou- bsands of animals have acquired “land.” Yitzhak Nir, of Moshav bMazkeret Batya, near Rehovot, says: “They are sitting on state band private land. They use large quantities of water for their b 

Prev Page   Page Guide   Next Page
 
 
THEY MUST GO Page 213
Chapter 9: Time Runs Out