THEY MUST GO Page 216
Chapter 9: Time Runs Out
 
 
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216 THEY MUST GO

ba Jaffa Arab one and a half times greater than the market bprice. . . . The Alfandari family did not ask questions, took the bmoney, and moved. . . . . The apartments are bought by Israeli bArabs but immediately rented to Gaza Arabs, some of whom dwelt here bbefore 1948. In a period of three months, on Kedem Street, no bfewer than twenty-two Jewish apartments were sold to bArabs.”

bThe return of pre-1948 Jaffa Arabs and their families not bonly illegally adds to the Arab population of Israel but adds an belement that will serve as a catastrophic precedent, opening the bdoor to loud demands of other—hundreds of thousands of other b—Arabs who fled for a similar “right to return.” From the gov- bernment there is only silence.

bThe Alfandaris may not have asked questions, but at least bone query is pertinent to yet another sickness within Israel. bWhere do the Arabs get so much money? It is estimated that Arabs bhave tens of millions of dollars in cash stored away. According bto tax officials, “Illegal capital is growing in the Arab sector and bis evidenced by the building of luxury villas in rows of villages, bthe purchase of new cars, travel abroad, and the acquisition of bvarious luxury items” (Yediot Aharonot, January 22, 1979). bWhere does this money come from when the vast majority of bIsraeli Jews struggle desperately to “finish the month”?

bThe answer is: They do not pay taxes. They pay nothing or only an babsurd percentage of what they should.

bFor the State of Israel, faced with a desperate need for funds bto solve the economic and social problems of its needy Jews, the bArabs of the state—who pay so little in taxes—are an intolerable bburden. They receive billions in national funds for welfare and bservices.

bIn a memorandum sent to Finance Minister Simha Ehrlich bin early 1979, Knesset member Meir Cohen wrote: “The Arab bsector in the country never paid and does not pay taxes. . . in brelation to its economic capacity and income. Traveling on the bnew road between Kiryat Ata and Nazareth, one sees that in the bvillages on the side, where ten years ago stood huts, there have bnow grown villas, more luxurious than those of Savion. . . .”

bThe following is taken from an article that appeared in bHa’Aretz (March 16, 1976): “The Arabs make up 15 percent of bthe state’s inhabitants, but pay only 1.5 percent of its taxes. Ac- b 

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THEY MUST GO Page 216
Chapter 9: Time Runs Out