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Chapter 10: Separation—Only Separation
 
 
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bhad vowed to wipe the Jewish state off the map as soon as it was bborn? What would any other people have done under the same bcircumstances? We need not look very far for the answer.

The German Minorities in Europe

bThe European states of Poland and Czechoslovakia are bclassic examples of those that harbored in their midst a danger- bous minority that brought them misery and grief. In both cases bthe minority was German, and both Poland and Czechoslo- bvakia, having barely survived the catastrophe that their German bminorities had brought them, at the first opportunity solved any bpotential future problems by firmly expelling them.

bThe Poles had been a people without a state for well over a bcentury. Their land having been divided among Russia, Austria, band Prussia, they finally attained independence again after bWorld War I. A sizable group of Germans remained in the new bPolish state, especially in its western provinces of Pomorze, bPoznania, and Upper Silesia. Almost from the start, despite for- bmal protestations of loyalty, the German minority did not bchange its true attitude toward the Polish state. There were bmany cases of spying in which the leaders of the German minor- bity were often involved. In 1926 a spy ring was discovered in bUpper Silesia, closely connected with the Volksbund, the lead- bing German Silesian organization. Ten prominent members of bthe organization were sentenced to imprisonment for treason.

bThe Polish-German nonaggression pact of 1934 did not bbring about any change in this attitude. Quite the opposite. bHitler was using his German ethnics for his dream of a “Ger- bman Reich.” The agents of the German government in Poznan, bPomorze, and Silesia offered secret credits on very favorable bterms to German farmers, traders, and artisans in return for a bpromise to work for the return of the lands to the Reich. Things bcame to such a pitch in 1936 that the Polish government closed bthirty branches of the Deutsche Vereinigung. In the following byear the subversive activities of the organization Rat der bDeutschen in Polen became so obvious that its president, Gero bvon Gersdorff, was arrested. In the same year the conspiracy of bthe National-Sozialistische Deutsche Arbeiter-Partei in Silesia bwas discovered. Its members swore loyalty to Adolf Hitler per- bsonally. In this trial 109 Germans were prosecuted, the majority b 

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THEY MUST GO Page 230
Chapter 10: Separation—Only Separation