THEY MUST GO Page 233
Chapter 10: Separation—Only Separation
 
 
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Separation—Only Separation 233

bboldness. Brazen protests and riots against the Czech govern- bment took place. On September 16 Henlein demanded annexation bof the Sudetenland by the Reich. This was followed by Munich, bthe separation of the Sudetenland from Czechoslovakia, and the beventual collapse of the Czech Republic.

bAfter the terrible war, with humiliation and destruction the bcost of its German minorities, the Czechs, too, understood the blesson. There would never again be a large number of Germans bin the country to dream of separation and to give anyone an bexcuse to destroy the country.

bWith or without anyone’s permission, the Poles and Czechs bwere determined to get rid of their Germans. At Potsdam, how- bever, in August 1945, Truman, Attlee, and Stalin informally bagreed (adding Hungary, too) and thus provided an interna- btionally legal basis for the expulsions. The “Big Three” agreed bas follows:

 

XIII. ORDERLY TRANSFERS OF GERMAN
                                     POPULATIONS

bThe Conference reached the following agreement on bthe removal of Germans from Poland, Czechoslovakia and bHungary:

bThe Three Governments, having considered the ques- btion in all its aspects, recognize that the transfer to Germa- bny of German population or elements thereof, remaining in bPoland, Czechoslovakia and Hungary, will have to be un- bdertaken. They agree that any transfers that take place bshould be effected in an orderly and humane manner.

bThe Poles and Czechs, with the memories of German batrocities fresh in their minds, were interested in rapid ex- bpulsion, “orderly and humane” or not. Large-scale expulsions bhad begun before the Potsdam Conference had ever convened, band millions were given twenty-four hours to leave. Billions of bdollars in property was left behind. Not a penny of compensa- btion was offered. The refugee arrived destitute and in misery. bTime magazine (October 22, 1945) wrote: “It is a tale of bhorror. . . .” In the West Pope Pius protested; an American bCommittee Against Mass Expulsion was formed; General W. bBedell Smith called it “repugnant and unacceptable.” The Poles band Czechs could not have cared less.

bNeither Pius nor the committee nor Smith was a Czech, or b 

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Chapter 10: Separation—Only Separation