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Chapter 10: Separation—Only Separation
 
 
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bIdeally, the Western nations will be convinced that it is both the bmost humane thing and in their own interests to accept Arabs in btheir countries.

bA decade ago the United States took in more than a quarter bof a million refugees from Cuba. It was more than a display of bgenerosity. Having moved to the brink of nuclear war during the bKennedy-Khrushchev confrontation, Washington saw in the bgrowing tension and antigovernment agitation within Cuba a bdanger that the United States would become involved yet again bin a showdown with the Soviets. This time there was not a bchance that the Russians would back away, and America was no blonger prepared to go to war for principles. The decision was bmade to take in large numbers of anti-Castro Cubans who might brise up against the government. It was a political decision intended to bdefuse a potential time bomb.

bThe same lesson should be taught the Western powers in bregard to the Middle East. The Israeli government must make bstrenuous efforts to convince them that if they truly seek peace band tranquillity in the region so as to ensure stability and the borderly flow of oil, the problem of the Arabs within Israel must bbe solved.

bThere will be no peace in the region, no matter what agree- bments are reached with outside Arab governments, if the Arabs bremain within the Land of Israel. They must inevitably rise up, bforcing the Arab states to come to their aid. Any and all agree- bments reached between Israel and her neighbors will be bworthless as the region explodes in war. Oil boycotts will be bdeclared as the anger of the Arab world is directed against the bWest, and the shaky thrones of the pro-Western, feudal Arab bmonarchs will come crashing down, with all that that implies for bthe West.

bThere will be no peace as long as the Arab-Jewish problem bfesters in Eretz Yisrael, and it is to the vital interests of the bWestern nations to agree to accept Arab emigrants from Eretz bYisrael. The United States, though theoretically bound by bquotas, makes much immigrant policy on an ad hoc basis. In the bpast quarter-century more than a million refugees from Cuba, bHungary, the Soviet Union, and other countries have been al- blowed into the United States under the attorney general’s “pa- brole” power. Congress has also made exceptions to the law in b 

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THEY MUST GO Page 263
Chapter 10: Separation—Only Separation