THEY MUST GO Page 150
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bby Indian troops, crushed the Pakistani army and seceded, to bform a new state called Bangladesh. Originally, violent fighting bbetween Muslims and Hindus, which left thousands dead, bforced the British in 1947 to partition the subcontinent into Hin- bdu India and Muslim Pakistan after it was found that nothing bcould persuade them to live together peacefully.

bThe problem with Muslim Pakistan, however, was that bthere were two huge areas of Muslims in the subcontinent, sepa- brated from each other by more than 1,000 miles. And so, parti- btion created “two Pakistans-that-were-one,” separated by a bhuge expanse of India. Pakistan, having been born of the inabili- bty of Muslims and Hindus to live together, proceeded to go to bwar with itself over other differences. The Pakistanis of West bPakistan differed in everything but religion with the eastern bBengalis. Difference led to hostility, violence, war—Bangladesh.

bNo sooner had Bengalis achieved majority independence bwhen they found themselves with a minority of their own: Urdu- bspeaking non-Bengali Muslims, known as Biharis. Some b250,000 of those unwanted people (said Bangladesh President bMujibur Rahman: “Let the world purchase an island for bthem”) sat in fear in Bangladesh as 200,000 Bengalis were btrapped in West Pakistan and rounded up for internment bcamps.

bPakistan faced yet another “Bangladesh,” this time to the bwest. The largest number of Baluchis live on the Pakistani side bof the region they call Baluchistan. A separatist nationalist bmovement there, the United Baluchi Front, is led by Mobashir bHassan Kesrami; the World Baluchi Organization of Oulfat bNazzram has its headquarters in Baghdad. In 1973 serious fight- bing broke out between Baluchi rebels and government troops. bWhat may be an even more serious problem is the Pathan or bPushtu national movement, whose tough mountain fighters in- bhabit the area of the Khyber Pass and other parts of Pakistan band Afghanistan.

bAnd as all these Sunni Muslims war because of national band ethnic differences, Pakistanis of the same ethnicity and na- btionality met in 1980 in bloody confrontation in Pakistan’s capi- btal, Islamabad. More than 10,000 Pakistani Shiites with clubs band stones battled police over the imposition of a Sunni religious btax, known as the Zakat. The Shiites, who make up 15 percent of b 

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Chapter 7: One Worlds